World Expo Rotterdam 2025

World Expo 2025 where ambition turns environmental challenges into economic opportunities

About the World Expo

World Expo

The World Expo is one of the world’s oldest international events. Every five years, millions of visitors from all over the world come together to visit the six-month long event and to share ideas on a universal theme. The Bureau Internationals des Expositions (BIE) oversees the organization of World Expos and selects the hosts.

This year the World Expo was held in Italy; World Expo Milano 2015. Its theme was 'Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life'. In 2020, the World Expo will be held in Dubai and the theme is 'Connecting Minds, Creating the Future'.

2025

Rotterdam is a city in the Netherlands with its eyes wide open to the world. It is a dynamic place with the biggest and most important port in Europe. Bringing the World Expo to Rotterdam fits perfectly with our constant drive for innovation and hands-on mentality. And what place would be more suited to discuss the transition to a new, sustainable economy than Rotterdam?

Positioned in the heart of a maze of waterways, it has always been a city shaped by its connections with the outside world and its port industries. Rotterdam knows that the sustainable development of port and city are of great economic, social and environmental importance. It plays a leading role in water and resource-related industries, making it the perfect place to talk about innovation in these fields.

The World Expo is a perfect opportunity for Rotterdam to show what it has to offer. Not only as a hub for innovation, but also as a hotspot for architecture, art and design buffs. Rotterdam: World Port, World City, World Expo.

ambition

An economy that is prosperous and thriving, but sustainable, fair and resource-efficient at the same time: it’s an ambition we can all share. But if we are going to get anywhere near achieving it, we have to close the gap between dreaming and doing.

The World Expo Rotterdam 2025 provides a great means to do so. We invite all members of the community, businesses, innovators, organizations, artists and scientists to work with us and think of projects that will drive economic growth and take ecological factors into account.

Do you have an idea that contributes to a sustainable world? An idea that needs to be carried out today and showcased at the World Expo Rotterdam in 2025? Get in touch with us and we will find the best way to support your plans. 

environmental challenges

Groundwater is rapidly becoming polluted and depleted. Our oceans are turning into plastic soup. And low-lying places are in danger of being submerged under water as sea levels rise. The linear 'take, make, dispose' model of industrialization disregards the limitations of our planet and harms the system it lives off. How to deal with this harsh reality?

World Expo Rotterdam 2025 supports the move towards a new reality. A reality in which today’s products are tomorrow’s resources. Think of disassembling old products to form new ones. Or think of using waste as energy. The possibilities are endless – as long as they contribute to a sustainable economy.  

We need to chuck our throw-away mentality and find exciting ways to restore and preserve what we have. For these reasons, the theme of World Expo Rotterdam 2025 is Changing Currents. One of the subthemes will be Deltas in Transition. As a delta city, Rotterdam can show the world how it links its green ambitions to a strong economy. 

economic opportunities

Current global markets have great strengths in promoting economic growth and reducing poverty. But let’s face it: the earth is finite. If we keep on producing and consuming goods and resources, we will eventually face limits to the growth of our economies. And even worse, dangerously large public debts will jeopardize the needs of future generations. How to turn around the worldwide economy? How to create clean and fair communities?

World Expo Rotterdam 2025 is a powerful tool for sustainable growth. It brings together the brightest minds in industry, academia, government and research to share ideas on a new economy that is energy and resource efficient. Millions of visitors can engage with these ideas and stories between now and in 2025.

News

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Introducing World Expo Rotterdam 2025

World Expo Rotterdam 2025 paves the way to a more sustainable economic model by addressing global water and resource issues. Here's a brief introduction to our plan and vision.

Read more about our World Expo

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Introducing World Expo Rotterdam 2025

World Expo Rotterdam 2025 paves the way to a more sustainable economic model by addressing global water and resource issues. Here's a brief introduction to our plan and vision.

Rotterdam is preparing a bid to host the World Expo in 2025, an event that tackles global problems through innovation and cultural exchange. World Expo Rotterdam 2025 supports the move towards a new sustainable reality. A reality in which we restore and preserve what we have. The key question we want to ask businesses, governments and communities involved is: how do we create an economy that is not only greener and more resilient, but also fairer? For this reason, the theme of World Expo Rotterdam 2025 is Changing Currents. One of the proposed subthemes is Deltas in Transition. As a delta city, Rotterdam can show the world how it links its green ambitions to a strong economy. 

The desire to build green and resilient societies is a key reason for organizing the World Expo Rotterdam 2025 on available space in the heart of the city. Our plan is to host over a hundred country pavilions that showcase their solutions for a sustainable economy in a world of finite resources. Everyone is invited to visit these pavilions: young and old, locals and cosmopolitans, entrepreneurs and tourists.

In our booklet Changing Currents / Deltas in Transition, which was published in October 2014, we explored the main principles and motivation for hosting a World Expo in Rotterdam. It received support and commitment from major Dutch companies, universities, NGOs, cultural institutions, various governments and multitude of other organizations and indiviuals, showing we are on the right track.

The production of the bid for World Expo 2025 is currently being executed as transparent as possible. We have been hosting monthly public information meetings where people can ask questions about the World Expo, its purpose and our plans. We also invite people and organizations to share innovative projects with us that require attention and acceleration. We want to provide a platform and spotlight for initiators and entrepreneurs, big and small, in the public and private domain, seasoned and fresh. At the same time, we are exploring and structuring required democratic decision-making.

Check out our website www.rotterdam2025.nl regularly, or follow us on Twitter or LinkedIn to stay informed about opportunities. Or visit the contact section and get in touch right away.

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What is a World Expo?

Rotterdam wants to host the World Expo in 2025. But what is a World Expo exactly?

More about the World Expo and its history

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What is a World Expo?

 

A World Expo, short for World Exposition, is one of the world’s oldest international events. Originally developed with a strong focus on technology and trade, the World Expo has evolved into a platform for the exchange of ideas and cultures. Every five years, millions of visitors from all over the world come together to visit the six-month long World Expo and share ideas on a universal theme. The Bureau International des Expositions (read more about the BIE here) was established in 1928 and defines the objective, bidding and organization of each World Expo.

Let’s go back in time to consider the impact that World Expos have had. The first World Expo dates from 1851 and was organized in Hyde Park, London. The Great Exhibition of the Work of Industry of All Nations was held in the spectacular Crystal Palace. It showcased incredible technological innovations, such as the first public toilets ever installed and a massive hydraulic press to print newspapers.

Throughout the years, the World Expo has presented many famous inventions to the world. Think of the radio in 1893, the television in 1939 and the mobile phone in 1970. Or think of the edible ice-cream cone and Heinz Tomato Ketchup – seemingly mundane yet brilliant products that were given a stage on past World Expos. World Expos have also seen the construction of magnificent buildings, such as the Eiffel Tower in Paris and the Atomium in Brussels. These iconic buildings still attract a lot of visitors today, showing that the legacy of the World Expo lives beyond the event itself.

The highlight of the World Expo is the Expo site, which closely resembles a market place where different cultures merge. On this gated site, every participating nation constructs a cutting-edge national pavilion. Everyone is invited to visit these pavilions and get a taste of each country’s most innovative projects and cultural highlights. 

But the World Expo is more than just a six-month exhibition. It has a huge impact on the development of the host country and participating nations. It is an important driver for structural change, because it provides the host with tools to develop its economy, industries and technologies. In Shanghai, for example, millions of people still reap the benefits of the public transport network, which was set up right before the World Expo in 2010.

Hosting a World Expo in Rotterdam would set a deadline for change. It paves the way towards a sustainable way of living. It also fits seamlessly with plans and ambitions of the Dutch government and local authorities. We want the World Expo Rotterdam 2025 to be a showstopper that captures the imagination of many.

Image Source: James Scott (via Flickr Creative Commons).

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Why Rotterdam?

Why is Rotterdam the designated city for hosting the World Expo?

World Port, World City, World Expo

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Why Rotterdam?

Rotterdam is a city in the Netherlands with its eyes wide open to the world. It is a dynamic place and it is the proud host of the biggest and most important port in Europe. Bringing the World Expo to Rotterdamf fits our constant drive for innovation and hands-on mentality perfectly.

Besides, what place is more suitable for a discussion of global water issues than Rotterdam? The city lies in the middle of a waterway maze and is therefore significantly characterized and shaped by water. The port of Rotterdam is a leading player in the water industry, which makes it the perfect place to talk about innovation.

Rotterdam has a rich history that has contributed strongly to its character. For instance, Rotterdam managed to rebuild itself after having being destroyed completely during World War II. The port of Rotterdam was the economic engine of the city and it quickly recovered after the attacking of the Germans. In just a small period of time the port ran on full blast again. 

After the reconstruction, Rotterdam became known for its new take on modern city life. In addition to this, people were drawn to the city because of its new smooth running transportation networks, unusual modern buildings and the new economic opportunities that Rotterdam had to offer.

And finally, here we are today. The past few years Rotterdam has often been praised for its unique features. Major news outlets such as the New York Times and Huffington Post have described the city of Rotterdam as a must-see. International design magazine Wallpaper jumped on the bandwagon and called Rotterdam “offbeat and fiercely committed to the new.” Clearly, we cannot do anything but agree with these glowing reviews. After years of hard work and bold choices, we are ready to show Rotterdam to the world.

Image Source: Rotterdam Marketing.

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‘This Expo should inspire the Millennial generation’

Jan van Nieuwenhuizen, member of the Executive Board of Rabobank, supports Expo 2025 and wants the Expo to inspire future generations.

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‘This Expo should inspire the Millennial generation’

Jan van Nieuwenhuizen is a member of the Executive Board of Rabobank and a strong supporter of Expo 2025. Since 2014 he is responsible for the bank’s Dutch and International Wholesale Banking activities. "As the largest financial services provider, we are strongly connected to all sectors of the Dutch economy. You could say that if The Netherlands do well, we do well also."

Rabobank has formulated two key strategic goals. In The Netherlands, the bank wants to be market leader in all financial services. Worldwide, Rabobank wants to be a global leader in the field of agriculture and food production. Given the history of the bank, leadership in these fields is understandable. “The Netherlands is the second food exporter in the world and in the area of agro-technology, our country is at the top,” says Van Nieuwenhuizen. 


Food and sustainability
As the leading global bank in food & agri, Rabobank wants to promote food security. This sustainable development is central to their clients. Over the years, Rabobank has managed to become a clear knowledge authority on this subject. According to Van Nieuwenhuizen, creating a more sustainable food chain should be an important topic at Expo 2025. “The world population is growing rapidly, particularly in Asia, and the availability of food and food security is therefore a priority for countries like India, Indonesia and China. These countries already have difficulty feeding their populations and this will become even more demanding in the years ahead, as they will continue to depend on major food producing regions such as the United States, Brazil, Australia and Europe. The Netherlands- with Rotterdam as its key logistics hub- takes a central position in this chain. 

As a company we have set inspiring goals. We have translated our ambition to become market leader in all-finance services in The Netherlands into ‘Banking for The Netherlands.’ We want to make a substantial contribution to the welfare and prosperity in The Netherlands. Our Food & Agri strategy - 'Banking for Food "- is focused on making the food chain more efficient and sustainable. How do we deal with the dilemmas of genetic engineering, intensive cattle breeding and new sources of protein in a global world where different norms and values exist? "

Millennial Generation
For Van Nieuwenhuizen Expo 2025 should be about more than trade: “The Millennial  generation is less attached to money and the ownership of goods. Young people want to give meaning to their lives. We also notice that within our own organization. They do not only want to do banking, but they also want to make an active social contribution to the quality of life in The Netherlands and to the food situation in the World.  The Expo should inspire this generation of the future. We are certainly willing to use our international expertise to bring Expo 2025 to the Netherlands. The Expo is an opportunity for The Netherlands and we shall gladly support the effort to realize it.”

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BROAD SUPPORT FOR PLANS EXPO 2025

More than 70 governments, social organizations and large companies support the proposal to host Expo 2025 in the Netherlands.

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BROAD SUPPORT FOR PLANS EXPO 2025

There is large support for the Netherlands’ proposal to host the World Expo of 2025, from both the public and the private sector. The proposal describes a different exposition than any earlier edition; the starting-point is ‘no leftovers’. Everything built for the expo will receive a new purpose, even after the event has finished. Furthermore, the plan for Expo 2025 includes a ten-year economics program that can possibly boost the GDP with around 50 billion euros.

The large enterprises already supporting the proposal are united in the Dutch Sustainable Growth Coalition (Philips, AkzoNobel, DSM, FrieslandCampina, KLM, Heineken, Shell and Unilever). Also ING, Rabobank, KPMG, EY, Van Oord and Siemens show their support. Furthermore, there is support from the region of South Holland, the cultural sector, the Port Authority Rotterdam, environmental organisations, knowledge centres and innovation platforms.     

The proposal for Expo 2025 has now been submitted to the ministries of Economic Affairs, Infrastructure & Environment and Foreign Affairs. These ministries will judge the plans based on a social cost-benefit analysis, by which the national government wants to analyse the costs and profits for Expo 2025. This strengthens collaboration between the national government, the region and business in general. Once this is done, the government will determine their position.

Economic transition
The primary focus of the companies, organisations and regional governments supporting Expo 2025, is on economics. Expo 2025 will be a means to speed up the transition to an intelligent, circular economy and make the Netherlands a leading global player. This starts now: investments are made and projects are being stimulated across a broad front in the process up to Expo 2025. These investments and projects can create economic opportunities for companies and knowledge institutions. However, these will also create a large amount of jobs and internships for university students and those still in high school.

Invitation to the world
The world exposition is a national event, hosted in Rotterdam. However, a World Expo is also a global event, which takes place in a different country every five years. World expositions are extensive and have strong global brand- and media value. A World Expo moreover, does not have a set structure. This allows the Netherlands to determine its own areas to focus on, namely economics, sustainability and promising no leftovers. Moreover, there will not be a separate terrain; the World Expo of 2025 will be integrated into the city using multiple locations. We invite the world to help us contribute towards an economic transition. In this way, The Netherlands wants to present itself as a leader in the ‘next economy’ in 2025.

Millions of visitors
Previous world expositions attracted tens of millions of visitors. This year, World Expo Milano received 21 million visitors. The largest expo in history was Shanghai in 2010, where 75 million visitors passed through the entrance gates. According to calculations, the Netherlands can handle the expected visitors stream well, due to elements of the program being spread out over the country. This enables other regions to profit from Expo 2025 as well. Tourism and business visits will increase throughout the entire country.

All parties involved in Expo 2025 see the event and the road up to it as a tremendous chance for the Netherlands. 

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Deltas in Transition

Rotterdam is a typical delta city with typical delta industries. The city is highly motivated to rethink and overhaul its economic model. Why? Take a look at our video!

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Rotterdam launches Innovation District

The city of Rotterdam transforms part of its port area into an Innovation District. This is also the intended location for Expo 2025.

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Rotterdam launches Innovation District

The Rotterdam Innovation District was launched at the well-attended Innovation Festival 2015, which took place on the 19th of November. Innovation Districts are areas in which progressive institutions and businesses are clustered and align themselves with start-ups, company incubators and accelerators. That is exactly what is happening in the Innovation District of Rotterdam: the relocation of port operations to the West has created space at the RDM Rotterdam and in the Merwe-Vierhaven area (M4H) for a rapidly growing innovation ecosystem for the smart manufacturing industry. Expo 2025 blends perfectly with the development vision of the area, provided by joint cooperation of the municipality of Rotterdam and the Port Authority of Rotterdam (Havenbedrijf).

Many innovative entrepreneurs discovered the area in recent years. Artist of the Year and designer Daan Roosegaarde, succeeded in realizing the first smog-free park here in Rotterdam. He describes moving his Dutch studio to M4H as ‘an upgrade in terms of the office building, the history and the context’. He stated: ‘I want to be where things are being manufactured, where people have dreams and where crossovers are being realized.’ Roosegaarde sees World Expo 2025 (which the Netherlands will win, according to him) as a possible accelerator for innovation.

Other fascinating examples of the Rotterdam Innovation District include incubators such as SuGu Club and the Erasmus Center of Entrepreneurship. But it is also home to unique testing grounds such as the Lab op Straat (Lab on the Street) and the Aqua Dock. Or consider Ampleman: the company that began as a start-up at the RDM Innovation Dock and has now become a global player.

Watch the video about the new Innovation District here or visit Stadshavens own website

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Meet the Team

Meet the people behind Expo 2025.

Our team

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Meet the Team

Leendert Bikker | Founder and Executive Director

Leendert Bikker is the founder and executive director of the World Expo Rotterdam 2025. He is an entrepreneur and developer by nature. In 1989, he founded Bikker Communications Group, the largest independent corporate communications group in the Netherlands, which was later acquired by Havas. He is the founder of BIKKER & Company and chairman of the boards of Scapino Ballet Rotterdam and ROC Zadkine. At the World Expo, Leendert combines his conceptual aspirations and entrepreneurial skills with his drive to make the world a better place.

 

Bart Schrijnen | General Manager

Bart studied Urban Planning at the Technical University of Delft. After his MSc degree, he landed a position at the Project Organization of Maasvlakte 2, a project of the Rotterdam Port Authority dedicated to port expansion. He worked for several housing associations as a project manager and also supplied data-driven software for real estate portfolio optimization. As a general manager at the World Expo Rotterdam 2025, he is in charge of the overall management of the event and the day-to-day operations of the team. 

 

Hans Waege | Senior Manager Event

Hans Waege, Ph.D. holds responsibility for event concept. He fulfils tasks including developing program and visitor experience concepts. Hans lives in Belgium and formerly worked as a researcher for the University of Leuven. He moreover assisted the head of cabinet of the Flemish government. In the Netherlands, Hans is well known for his time as the director of Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra between 2009 and 2014. Hans also fulfils diverse positions in boards within the social and cultural sector. 

 

Jolien Wiesenhaan | Senior Manager Holland 2025

Jolien Wiesenhaan is responsible for (international) marketing and branding of World Expo 2025. She is developing relevant platforms with (international) partners to start building visitor- and participant awareness. Jolien has an extensive track record as marketer and has worked for multinational Unilever for over ten years. She is currently active as an independent professional and moreover director-owner of the Dutch Vision Institute, a company that focuses on the corporate branding of companies and organisations. Her proposition: “the difference between success and failure is in knowing where you want to go.” We therefore always start with asking the question "WHY?".

 

Jannelieke Aalstein | Senior Manager Bid, Lobby and Votes

Whether or not Rotterdam will eventually host World Expo 2025 ultimately depends on the decision made by the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE), an international organisation established in Paris. The BIE, of which the Netherlands is a member, is responsible for choosing a winner from all the cities that apply during the year 2016. In regards to this decision, Jannelieke Aalstein prepares both the national and international lobby. The national lobby is necessary in order for the Netherlands to apply their bid in 2016, whereas the latter is required to be able to take on the international competition. Her experience as top-advisor for Ahmed Aboutaleb, the mayor of Rotterdam, enables her to expand on a large network of management and experience. Jannelieke combines her efforts for World Expo Rotterdam 2025 with her new position as manager Networks and Marketing at Rotterdam Partners, in which government, establishments and the business industry work together for the economy and promotion of Rotterdam. 

 

Christian Mol | Senior Manager Acceleration

The initiative for World Expo Rotterdam 2025 was taken from an economic perspective: the acceleration of a transition to a circular economy. World Expo Rotterdam 2025 aims to be a platform where innovative entrepreneurs, knowledge institutes and investors not only find, but also strengthen each other in their shared ambition. Banker Christian Mol is working hard to make this mission a reality on the back of substantial experience and a large network within the financial sector. In his 35-year career, Christian consecutively fulfilled both national and international executive positions at ABN-AMRO, Rabobank and Deutsche Bank.

 

Liesbeth Schipper | Senior Manager Spatial Planning and Infrastructure

As World Expo Rotterdam 2025 deals with hundreds of hectares of pavilions and terrains, as well as millions of visitors, it naturally has a huge impact on the space and infrastructure of the Netherlands. In regards to this, Liesbeth Schipper leads the team responsible for mapping out how World Expo Rotterdam 2025 can be managed spatially and what this entails for the infrastructure. Moreover, the expected amount of visitors must be managed both safely and efficiently. Liesbeth is a civil engineer and has been added to the World Expo team from Royal Haskoning DHV. Amongst other things, she formerly worked for the National Delta Program, the Climate Program and the Innovation Program Areas Energy Neutral. 

 

Bob van den Berg | Senior Manager Learning and Working

World Expo Rotterdam 2025 can generate many new jobs, both during the event and afterwards. Ambitiously, the younger citizens of Rotterdam will already fulfil internships and earn credits and certificates in the lead-up to the World Expo. Social entrepreneur Bob van den Berg has taken on this challenge and is therefore responsible for developing a broad program regarding this ambition. Bob does so in cooperation with organisations actively involved in employment and education. This challenge very well fits the networking projects and events of his company Done Right. An example of this is the working out of the youth employment initiative Bigday.

 

Florentine van Boetzelaer-Tiemstra | International Account Manager

Florentine grew up living in different countries around the world. She received a Bachelor degree in Dutch Law and a Bachelor and Master degree in International Relations / International Organizations at the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen. Before joining the World Expo Rotterdam 2025 in April 2014, she worked for several organizations and companies as a freelance communications advisor and project manager, including Amnesty International. As the international account manager of the team, she is responsible for international lobbying and for the contacts with the Bureau International des Expositions in Paris. 

 

Harmen Wolf | Project Manager Business & Science

Harmen completed his Bachelor in Political Science at Leiden University and Master in Public Administration at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. As a student, he was an active member of De Kleine Consultant, a student-run consulting firm that provides strategic advice for companies and organizations. He also worked at the headquarters of Dutch political party D66 and at the Erasmus University, developing a keen interest in public-private partnerships. At the World Expo he is responsible for the  Business & Science program.

 

Puck Weijnand | Project Assistant

Puck became a member of the team with effect of October 2014, after graduating with a Bachelor degree in Business Administration from the TIO University of Applied Sciences. Having previously worked in hospitality, she now provides the World Expo team with administrative and event planning support.

 

Joelle Mulder | Project Assistant

Joelle received her Bachelor in Hotel and Event Management at TIO University of Applied Sciences. During her studies she did a Sales & Marketing internship at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Tenerife on the Canary Islands. She completed a travel research project at NEM Energy BV after graduating and worked as a Conference & Events Coordinator at the Kurhaus Hotel in The Hague. At The World Expo she is responsible for all the events taking place prior to the Expo.   

 

Michiel Koorenhof | Communication Manager

Michiel Koorenhof was asked to join the World Expo team to help and build-up a well-developed communication infrastructure. This decision was made regarding his simultaneous involvement in the sector ‘Urban Development’ for the municipality of Rotterdam. Michiel graduated from the Erasmus University in Economic History in the late ‘80s and started his career as an independent journalist and copywriter. In 1997 he was employed in the then-owned company of Leendert Bikker, where we was educated to become advisor and eventually partner. After nine years of Bikker, he transferred to the municipality of Rotterdam where he has worked as communication manager ever since. 

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Increasing urban population

Global urbanization important topic for World Expo Rotterdam 2025

Click here to read why

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Increasing urban population

By 2050, the world’s urban population is expected to increase to 66 percent, adding another 2.5 billion people to the cities. Managing urban areas is therefore extremely important for the 21st century. That is why World Expo Rotterdam 2025 acknowledges this as an important topic. World Expo Rotterdam 2025 is about innovation, where its main objective is to find sustainable solutions regarding the growing urban populations. The biggest challenge herein is the fact that these cities are growing so rapidly, while this simultaneously brings great amounts of innovation.

In Beijing, pollution has reached hazardously dangerous levels, up to 20 times the limit recommended by the World Health Organization. Several big cities located in China's three main economic zones have more than 200 hazy days per year. The main reason for this is not the unfavorable weather conditions, but rapid industrialization and urbanization, according to Wu Xiaoqing, vice minister of environmental protection.

Today, over half of the world’s population (54 percent) lives in urban areas and the population is expected to increase to 66 percent by 2050. Moreover, by 2030, the world is projected to have 41 mega-cities with 10 million inhabitants or more, which is almost triple the amount of 1990. According to the new United Nations report launched in July 2014, this urbanization combined with the growth of the world’s population could add another 2.5 billion people to urban populations by 2050, where almost 90 percent of the increase is concentrated in Asia and Africa.

By 2045, the world’s urban population is expected to exceed six billion. Even though globally, cities only cover half a percentage of the total land area, inhabitants consume 75% of the available natural resources. So, according to John Wilmoth, Director of UN DESA’s Population Division, “managing urban areas has become one of the most important development challenges of the 21st century. Our success or failure in building sustainable cities will be a major factor in the success of the post-2015 UN development agenda.”

The rapid growth in urban populations means communities are challenged to find sustainable solutions with as little resources as possible. The UN cautions that sustainable urbanization requires cities to generate better income and employment opportunities, and to "expand the necessary infrastructure for water and sanitation, energy, transportation, information and communications; ensure equal access to services; reduce the number of people living in slums; and preserve the natural assets within the city and surrounding areas".

In 2015, the United Nations developed their Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s), one of them being ‘make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable’. Targets include providing sustainable yet affordable transport systems, and ensuring access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing. These targets are subject of one of the main themes of World Expo Rotterdam 2025.

The most important aspect when it comes to expanding urbanization, is knowing how to deal with it. A successful urban planning agenda will require that attention be given to urban settlements of all sizes. If well managed, cities offer important opportunities for economic development and for expanding access to basic services for large numbers of people. For example, a growing population and the more densely they are networked, also leads to greater innovation, which will likely create the next green revolution. The urban planning agenda will be further worked out during the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements in 2016.

World Expo Rotterdam 2025 recognizes the necessity of sustainable adaptations regarding urban population growth, and looks forward to contributing where possible.

For more information on this topic, please click here

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Lonely Planet rewards Rotterdam 'Best in Travel 2016'

Rotterdam is very proud to have been rewarded a top-10 spot in Lonely Planet's 'Best of Travel 2016'. We couldn't have asked for a bigger compliment.

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Lonely Planet rewards Rotterdam 'Best in Travel 2016'

Lonely Planet is the largest and most influential publisher of travel guides worldwide. “The largest authority concerning travel has labelled Rotterdam as one of the most exciting cities in the world at the moment. We cannot receive a larger compliment as a city”, according to Maarten Struijvenberg, alderman for economics and employment.

Rotterdam is bursting with modern, post-modern and contemporary construction and offers a veritable array of art, top-class restaurants and atmospheric nightlife, making it one of Lonely Planet’s must-see destinations for 2016, according to Tom Hall, Editorial Director of Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel 2016. It is a remarkable feat for a city largely razed to the ground by WWII bombers. Rebuilding has continued unabated ever since with ingenuity and vision.

A recent highlight is the Markthal Rotterdam, the city’s 40m-high, inaugural indoor food market. Other must-see’s include De Rotterdam, the Erasmusbridge, De Kunsthal and Station Hofplein.

Rotterdam is the only Dutch city that has been included in Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel 2016. Conrad van Tiggelen, marketing director NBTC mentions the following, “It validly puts Rotterdam back in the picture with many potential visitors and it strengthens the image of the destination Holland abroad. It is a recognition for Rotterdam as a must see present-day architectural city and shows that the city is a fine base to explore the Netherlands as a whole. This is a beautiful stimulus for The Netherlands in general and Rotterdam in particular.”

The travelling industry has high expectations for Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel each year, in which the top 10 countries, cities and regions for the upcoming year are tipped. “This is the best recommendation a city can get, according to Ron Voskuilen, director of Rotterdam Partners. We expect this to give a large impulse for the amount of visitors that will come to Rotterdam next year. This acknowledgement by Lonely Planet moreover shows that Rotterdam has developed to a full-fledged touristic destination, with an interesting supply for different types of travellers. That is also a large compliment for the entrepreneurs in the touristic industry, the municipality and the citizens of Rotterdam that make the city what it is today.”

The Best in Travel Awards will be handed out during the Best in Travel 2016 Reception of Lonely Planet in London’s Transport Museum. For more information about Rotterdam in Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel 2016, please continue here.

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Rotterdam hosts first international water exchange workshops

Rotterdam selected by Rockefeller Foundation as reward for its efforts towards maintaining a livable city despite the increasingly extreme weather.

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Type: news

Rotterdam hosts first international water exchange workshops

Rotterdam has a rich history when it comes to climate issues. This shouldn’t be surprising as 80% of its land lies below sea level, meaning that water plays a huge factor in Rotterdam. Not only does Rotterdam have one of the largest international ports in the world, but it has also contributed its ideas regarding climate change and water quite impressively. In 2007, Rotterdam became active within the large global network of cities, C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group. From then on, Rotterdam has worked together with New York City, New Orleans and Melbourne within the program ‘Connecting Delta Cities’. So, when the Rockefeller Foundation selected Rotterdam, amongst 32 other cities, as member-state for the ‘100 Resilient Cities Network’ in December 2013, this wasn’t a big shock. Ahmed Aboutaleb, Mayor of Rotterdam, stated the following: “This is a confirmation that Rotterdam has proven itself internationally, as a delta city that prepares itself for the future and also knows how to keep dry feet.”

To reward all Rotterdam’s efforts, the Rockefeller Foundation has now selected Rotterdam as host for the first international workshops regarding water exchange. As support for better protection against the consequences of climate change, the Rockefeller Foundation is providing 100 million dollars so the Resilient Cities can maintain in contact within their network, can exchange experiences, set up plans for climate adaptation and for developing exemplar projects.

In order to exchange their experiences, members of Asian, American and European cities are visiting Rotterdam in October for a four-day session on water and climate. Arnoud Molenaar, Rotterdam’s Chief Resilience Officer, mentions that more than half of the global population lives in cities, and for many of these cities water and climate change are an issue. He states the following, “If you are thinking about solutions, you can look at Rotterdam. We may as well be proud of that.” However, according to Molenaar, we can also learn a lot from other cities. “We have centuries of experience with water, yet new insights from ourselves and our international colleagues will make us stronger. Cities are sharing these insights more often.”

Preparations regarding proportional extreme weather conditions are a part of the ambitions of Rotterdam Climate Initiatives (RCI). Not only will Rotterdam realize a 50% CO2-reduction by 2025, they also aim to be 100% climate proof by then. Together with inhabitants, companies and other institutions, Rotterdam is taking the responsibility for a sustainable future as an energetic and innovative global port.

A project that connects well to Rotterdam’s ambitions for 2025 is to host the World Expo of 2025. By doing so, Rotterdam aims to show the world how it links its green ambitions to a strong economy. Whereas the event has always been held outside the city during previous World Expo’s, Rotterdam’s Expo team plans on bringing the event into the city. This is to operate as sustainably as possible while leaving no leftovers. Moreover, team Expo plans on hosting over a hundred country pavilions that showcase their solutions for a sustainable economy in a world of finite resources. As economic growth and development take place mainly in urban deltas, Rotterdam aims to demonstrate its knowledge regarding ‘Deltas in Transition’ yet also invites the world to contribute to this economic transition. 

Type: information

Ahmed Aboutaleb: a new economy starts in the city

World Expo Rotterdam 2025 calls for executives with courage and ambition, according to Aboutaleb, Mayor of Rotterdam.

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Type: information

Ahmed Aboutaleb: a new economy starts in the city

Ahmed Aboutaleb, mayor of Rotterdam, strongly believes that the cities will be the leading factor for the transition to a new, sustainable, economic model. In the HJ Schoo-lecture he held on September 1st, Aboutaleb mentions a ‘third urban revolution’. An expanding amount of people is settling in the city, thus creating new dynamics where private initiatives play a prominent role. World Expo Rotterdam 2025 is a great example of this, according to Aboutaleb. “It asks for executives with courage and ambition to make this dream a reality.”

The mayor of Rotterdam stresses the importance of the economic motive The Netherlands has, which is the basis of the initiative to bring World Expo 2025 to the Netherlands. “The traditional industry and horticulture have almost arrived at a stage of transition to sustainable business models regarding the metropolitan region Rotterdam The Hague. Think about the transition from a petrochemical to a biochemical infrastructure, the re-use of CO2 as a raw material in the horticulture, smart energy networks where industrial rest warmth is used to heat up households and greenhouses and the sustainable transport of goods.” According to Aboutaleb, The Netherlands must ensure that the social-economical aspect will remain a global player. In this, the cities should play the leading role.

Aboutaleb further mentions the power and potential of the metropolitan region Rotterdam The Hague: “People from all around the globe live here. They are used to doing business with the entire world.” The region is responsible for 25% of Dutch export and moreover 20% of the total export wages in the Netherlands. Where the region Eindhoven takes a first place, the metropolitan region Rotterdam The Hague has the second largest share in high-tech-export of The Netherlands. A large part of the international investments are also conducted in the metropolitan region.

The international orientation of the metropolitan region is supported by great infrastructure and three excellent universities mentioned in the top-100 of the Times Higher Education-ranking; Leiden, TU Delft and the Erasmus University. Aboutaleb sees chances in connections between the regional economy and that of the port. The proximity of the port functions as a dial for import, recycling and upcycling of (waste)materials and raw materials, and attracts supporting sectors such as logistics, high tech administration and creative design, according to the mayor.

For The Netherlands to maintain its strong economic position in the future, technological breaks and large investments are needed. Aboutaleb expects large amounts of private initiatives: “The Netherlands must take its citizens and entrepreneurs seriously. They are the ones with the ideas, they have to do it eventually.” Aboutaleb specifically calls on a group of entrepreneurs and their plan to bring World Expo 2025 to Rotterdam: “World Expo’s attract innovative entrepreneurs from all around the world. It is a chance to show what we are able to achieve, as a city but also as a country. What do these initiators need? Not people looking from the side-lines, but executives with courage and ambition to make this dream a reality.”

Read about Aboutaleb’s complete lecture on Elsevier.

Type: information

KLM’s Holland Herald highlights the city of Rotterdam

The september issue of KLM’s inflight magazine Holland Herald finds out why Rotterdam is such an innovative place.

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Type: information

KLM’s Holland Herald highlights the city of Rotterdam

‘Rotterdam is a city where we dare to experiment and innovate’, says Leendert Bikker, director of team Expo 2025 about his hometown in the September issue of Holland Herald. ‘With almost every nationality in one city, we emanate entrepreneurship, we are curious and inventive and we love a challenge.’

Holland Herald praises the hands on mentality and resourcefulness of the Rotterdam business community. With its large port Rotterdam has an international focus. In many ways it’s the perfect place to host World Expo 2025.

Read the full article on the Holland Herald website

Type: information

The city as a breeding ground

Cities are attracting more and more people and are becoming increasingly important as economic centres for the production of goods, local energy and food supplies.

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Type: information

The city as a breeding ground

If cities are able to facilitate the organising capacity of their communities, this will lead to the development of more small-scale, locally organised networks of manufacturers and consumers.

But one sees a lot more going on in the North Sea Delta. With a major international port in its immediate vicinity, the city of Rotterdam
enjoys a unique position that presents both risks and opportunities. Here too, the labour market is considerably affected by global developments. Firms need to innovate to remain competitive. Chemical companies can take even greater advantage of synergies between their sector and the industrial cluster. The port is set on remaining a key logistic pivot for Europe, but is simultaneously aware that by 2030-2040, the share of fossil streams will have changed considerably.

The connection of the city and the port offers opportunities for the further reinforcement of the region’s economic structure with strong
clusters and innovative crossovers in the city. Multinationals can team up with the SME sector in the co-creation and utilisation of innovative technologies. Developments in IT, 3D printing, clean transport and traffic and the circular exploitation of raw materials will create new innovative impulses across all clusters. The same applies to knowledge institutes such as research universities, universities of applied sciences and institutions of senior secondary vocational education, who work to deliver graduates with the right qualifications for a changing employment market. Technological and social innovations are prerequisites for providing
an ‘expanding’ city and a port-industrial complex ‘under pressure’ – both of which are going through a process of transition towards a
sustainable future – with sufficient prospects for jobs and a healthy social environment.

For a concrete definition of this need for innovation, we should not so much look to the government, as the private sector and the regional partners. With the municipal administration in a partner role, Rotterdam has identified four key economic clusters that can strengthen the region’s economic structure on the basis of public-private partnerships: Clean Tech Delta, Maritime Delta, Medical Delta and Food Delta. The region has a high concentration of companies and knowledge institutes that focus on technological innovations within and in partnership with a variety of sectors.

Still, so far the Netherlands – and this also applies to Rotterdam – has not been particularly successful in generating added social value from this strong concentration of knowledge in the form of new investments and jobs that contribute significantly to the local quality of life. Initiatives such as Kenniscentrum RDM & RDM Campus, Versnelling  010, MakerSpace, Clean Tech Delta, Plant One and the Circularity Center are merely the first steps. One inspiring example of how it can be done is the international success of the Rotterdam adaptation strategy. This strategy, which combines protection from the surrounding water with urban development
projects, has already yielded numerous new contracts for the private sector. Consequently, the Rotterdam innovation clusters are geared towards accelerating the process between conception and realisation. This makes Rotterdam a laboratory, catalyst and testing ground for sustainable urban development and new employment.

Type: information

The vision of ... Allard Castelein

Allard Castelein, Chief Executive of the Port of Rotterdam Authority, shares his views on World Expo Rotterdam 2025.

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Type: information

The vision of ... Allard Castelein

The port of Rotterdam is of great importance to the Dutch economy. The port provides 180,000 jobs and generates about 21 billion euros (3.5% of GDP) in revenue for the Netherlands annually. From that perspective Castelein looks at the plans for the expo.

"If we want to secure the future of the port we must dare to think ahead. I therefore believe in setting ambitious goals and Rotterdam World Expo 2025 fits very well into these. With the exhibition we can take a big step forward in the transition to a new economic model. What appeals to me is that we are able to start with this transition today. The initiative brings together parties that want to invest in innovation. The Port of Rotterdam is one of those parties.”

Rotterdam World Expo 2025 anticipates in an upcoming energy transition and a shift towards a circular economy. Does Castelein believe this could be a threat to the port in which fossil fuels still play an important role? "Let me be clear: in 2025 a big part of the port will still handle the raw materials, commodities and energy flows of today. But in addition, I see good opportunities to develop new economic activities that could be very profitable ventures for the port of the future. We are actually already well under way. Look for example at the RDM site where plenty of innovation takes place. For me, the added value of Rotterdam World Expo 2025 is that it gives a significant boost to innovation by creating new infrastructure, encouraging entrepreneurship and the power of pursuing an ambitious goal together."

Type: information

Discover Rotterdam

Get to know the international city of Rotterdam.

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Type: information

Discover Rotterdam

Rotterdam is a young, international city with a passionately beating heart.

The city keeps reinventing itself at a rapid pace by redefining and expanding its already impressive skyline every time you visit. It also presents new cultural and sporting events to surprise and delight you. Its ever-changing nature makes Rotterdam a city that you can rediscover time and again.

Rotterdam is featured in the Rough Guides and in the New York Times as a city that you must visit. Both praise Rotterdam highly, not in the least for its architecture. Rotterdam is known for its seaport, the largest port in Europe. Its focus is on a multifaceted, sustainable, safe and attractive port, which meets high social demands.

Learn more about what the city has to offer: Rotterdam.info

Explore the Port of Rotterdam

 

Type: information

Food in the metropolitan region

The Fenix Food Factory has grown into a Rotterdam culinary hotspot, but above all serves as a local hub for food sourced directly from the region.

Read more about this Rotterdam hotspot and metropolitan agriculture

Type: information

Food in the metropolitan region

Hel & Verdoemenis, Kaapse Karel, Houten Carrie and another two dozen or so brews: the home-made, alluringly-named products of microbreweries based in the Rotterdam district of Katendrecht are popular among beer aficionados. These breweries are set up in the old Fenix Sheds in Katendrecht’s ‘De Kaap’ neighbourhood. The Fenix Food Factory, based on a concept developed by the young psychologist Arthur Nijhuis, has grown into a Rotterdam culinary hotspot, but above all serves as a local hub for food sourced directly from the region.

The area is presently being redeveloped. The Municipality has created room for new initiatives and based on a three-year lease, the old shed offers a solid home base for young entrepreneurs who take a traditional approach to the supply of responsible produce and are able to effectively realise their ambitions in this area. Jordy’s Bakery, Booij Cheeses, the Van Buiten butchery, CiderCider, Stielman Coffee Roasters: these local producers supply a variety of breads, cheeses, meats, beers, ciders, coffee and all sorts of other treats. The food chain is also very short in the case of the Rechtstreex: its vegetables, fruit, juices and dishes all come straight from the farmlands surrounding Rotterdam. Food trucks and the organised events and markets at Fenix repeatedly draw visitors to the location for novel experiences.

An alternate approach to food production involves scaling up rather than down – but remaining close to the consumer. Within the anticipated development of the Rotterdam-The Hague metropolitan region, local green areas like Westland and Delfland can play a new role in what has been dubbed ‘metropolitan agriculture’.

Metropolitan agriculture aims to create more food awareness by reconnecting the city and the countryside. However appealing the concepts may sound, we won’t be able to supply an entire metropolitan region with food on the basis of inner-city and small-scale organic farming. The main idea behind metropolitan agriculture is that intensive farming at locations in the vicinity of the city should be able to supply an adequate volume of safe, varied and sustainable agricultural products. A good example of this approach is the design of stacked, energy-neutral greenhouses that are supplied with CO2 and residual heat from local industry. At the same time, a share of today’s farmland could actually be restored to nature. While the idea sounds interesting, the question remains whether we are able – and indeed prepared – to set up such a system in the Netherlands. One example of a possibly self-sufficient super-region is ABC-Rhineland (Amsterdam-Brussels-Cologne): an area home to 70 million people, where 70% of the surface has been built up or cultivated at the expense of nature. Metropolitan agriculture is designed to prevent this lopsided growth, and where possible reverse it.

Type: information

Shifting Relations

Today, many major news events relate to geopolitical tensions and individual countries’ access to fossil fuels. What does this development mean for Europe and the Netherlands?

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Type: information

Shifting Relations

Never before in history have energy, the environment and prosperity been so closely intertwined, as was already pointed out in 2013 by the International Energy Agency in its World Energy Outlook for the period until 2035. Today, many major news events relate to geopolitical tensions and individual countries’ access to fossil fuels. What does this development mean for Europe and the Netherlands?

There’s nothing wrong with doomsday scenarios, as long as they yield timely solutions. It’s a well-known fact that our fossil fuel reserves are finite. Nevertheless, that the 21st century will actually prove a turning point in the consumption of these resources is mainly due to growing concern about global warming and the role that greenhouse gases like methane and carbon dioxide play in this process, which is so difficult to reverse. That is why we will need to make a start on the transition towards renewable, carbon-neutral energy sources. After all, the Stone Age didn’t end because people ran out of stones, but because they had access to better options, as Professor of Transition Jan Rotmans of Erasmus University Rotterdam likes to remind us.

The IEA expects that by now, a temperature increase of 3.6°C is more likely than the desired limited increase of 2°C. In areas where this puts the habitable environment under pressure, this will lead to large-scale migration. Although national governments need to assume shared responsibility and work towards joint solutions on a global scale, it has proven next to impossible for them to agree on common climate measures. In addition, it appears as if public debate focuses more on which targets the authorities won’t be achieving than on the opportunities that the various transition paths present us to realise a sustainable future.

The energy mix is changing quite slowly, despite increased reliance on sustainable sources like wind and solar energy, biomass and hydropower. The outlook sketched by IEA’s head economist Fatih Birol for public- and private-sector administrators in Rotterdam in early 2014 only underlines the urgency of the energy transition.

• Global energy demand will have doubled by the year 2035.

• Sustainable energy will meet some 50% of this increased demand, but 75% of the energy mix in 2035 will still be based on fossil sources.

• From 2020 on, India and China will dominate the growing energy demand, making Europe less interesting as a market for supplier countries. The US and Brazil are able to meet their own requirements, and will even develop into energy exporters.

• Europe is in a vulnerable position: the major regional differences in energy availability and prices have an impact on local economic development and consequently the prosperity of individual citizens.

We need to establish a strong European energy policy to ensure that we can continue to provide the companies and citizens of the various member states with sufficient affordable energy. The IEA emphasises that optimum efficiency in energy consumption forms a key pillar in this context. However, around two-thirds of the European energy production facilities are in need of modernisation. Europe needs to invest in a combination of solutions – more sustainable energy, optimum energy efficiency and CCS (carbon capture, reuse and storage) – in order to keep climate issues in check during the transition towards a completely carbon-neutral society. The Netherlands can position itself at the forefront of such developments and apply its existing knowledge in the area of sustainable innovations in the short term – within Dutch borders and further afield.

 

Type: information

Road to 2025

Preparing a World Expo bid takes meticulous planning and organization. What important dates lie ahead of us?

Our timeline

Type: information

Road to 2025

Preparing a World Expo bid takes meticulous planning and organization. What important dates lie ahead of us? This is our timeline:

2013 – 2015: The genesis and development of the idea.

2016: Official application of the World Expo Rotterdam 2025 candidature dossier to the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE)

2016 – 2018: Promotion of our application all over the world and the start of innovative, World Expo-related projects

2018: Voting of BIE member states for the host country of World Expo 2025

2025: The year of the World Expo

Type: video

Rebuilding New York after Hurricane Sandy

A proposed sub-theme of our World Expo is 'Deltas in Transition'. Dutch water-expert Henk Ovink explains how the ‘Rebuild by Design’ approach made New York more resilient.

Type: video

Rebuilding New York after Hurricane Sandy

A proposed sub-theme of World Expo Rotterdam 2025 is 'Deltas in Transition'. Dutch water-expert Henk Ovink knows all about deltas and has designed a model that can prevent the next Hurricane Sandy.

In his role as the Chair of the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, Dutch water-expert Henk Ovink has emphasized the importance of turning water-related risks into opportunities. The Rebuild by Design approach, in which Ovink has played an important role, has generated ten groundbreaking design interventions to prevent disasters induced by climate change. To fight climate change, Ovink says, other countries should incorporate water management into the very fabric of urban systems.

World Expo Rotterdam 2025 wants to share Ovink's lesson with the world. One of the proposed sub-themes of the World Expo, Deltas in Transition, will enable water experts and others members of community from all over the world to think of ways to work with water – rather than to battle it. The Foundation therefore invite innovative thinkers to share their projects and plans on transition in delta regions.

Curious to know more about Henk Ovink's plans to Rebuild by Design? Watch a short video about the Sandy project to learn more.

Type: information

Meet our Supervisory Board

Who's who: the Supervisory Board of the World Expo 2025.

Who's who?

Type: information

Meet our Supervisory Board

The World Expo Rotterdam 2025 Foundation is supported by a Supervisory Board consisting of experienced and reputable members with diverse backgrounds. The Board is responsible for overall monitoring of the Foundation's operations.

Meet our Board:

Charlotte Insinger (chair)

Mrs. Charlotte M. Insinger, MBA (1965), chairman of the Board, held various positions at Shell, Robeco and the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam. She is a Supervisory Board member of Ballast Nedam and SNS Reaal, among other positions.

Marielle Koppenol-Laforce

Ms. Prof. mr. M.E. Marielle Koppenol-Laforce (1961) is attorney and partner at Houthoff Buruma and an academic in International Commercial Contract Law at Leiden University. She is a commission of the state and a member of the editorial staff for various magazines. In addition to this, she is an International Fellow of the American Bar Foundation. 

Frans van Houten

Drs. Frans van Houten (1960) has been CEO of Royal Philips since 2011. He held several positions in the company in the Netherlands, the United States, Germany and other countries. He was appointed as CEO of Philips Semiconductors in 2004 and later became CEO of NXP for four years after its spin-off from Philips. 

Roland Pechtold 

Drs. Roland Pechtold MBA (1970) held several positions at Shell and was a Board Member of Argos Group before he became CEO of Nova Terminals. He is, among other positions, the Chairman of the Supervisory Board of the Maritime Museum in Rotterdam.

Johan Wakkie

Mr. Johan Wakkie (1953) is a former hockey international. He was head of P&O at NOC-NSF before becoming the General Director of the Royal Dutch Hockey Federation (KNHB). In 1998 and 2014, he was closely involved in bringing the Hockey World Cup to the Netherlands, as well as organizing the events. Wakkie is the Chairman of the Steering Committee for Sports and Culture and Chairman of the Netherlands Wind Ensemble. 

Type: information

What is the role of the Bureau International des Expositions?

The Bureau International des Expositions (BIE) plays an important role in the organization of a World Expo.

Learn more about the BIE

Type: information

What is the role of the Bureau International des Expositions?

The Bureau International des Expositions (BIE), established in 1928, is the Paris-based organization in charge of regulating the bidding, selection and organization of World Expos. Every five years, countries that want to organize the World Expo submit a bid to the BIE. All member states of the BIE – 168 countries as of 2014 – will then decide which country has the best bid.

The last World Expo bid was won by Dubai, which will host the event in 2020. In 2015, Milan will be hosting the World Expo under the theme ‘Feeding the Planet: Energy for Life’. Even after a bid is secured, the BIE plays an important role. It ensures the quality of World Expos and their compliance with international law. But it also provides organizers and participants with a platform to meet and discuss the event. Simply said: without the BIE, there would be no World Expo.

Organizing an event that celebrates innovation and global interconnectedness is a worthwhile effort. Imagine hosting a party for millions of people of hundreds of nationalities! Before World Expo Rotterdam culminates into the actual event in 2025, several steps have to be taken. What does the World Expo lifecycle look like? And what role does the BIE play in this process? 

  1. Submission of a candidature dossier: Every country that wishes to organize a World Expo must submit an official candidature dossier to the BIE. The dossier has to contain various elements, such as the motivation behind the bid, the proposed site and the required financial steps to organise the event.
  2. Bidding process: Once the candidature dossier is all brushed up and ready, the BIE visits all candidate countries to assess the feasibility of their proposed World Expo projects. During this process, all candidates will gather political and public support.
  3. Voting process: The bidding phase is over; the BIE members now vote by secret ballot and allocate a World Expo to a national government.
  4. Registration of the World Expo: After a country and host city have been selected, a definitive plan for the World Expo has to be submitted to the BIE.
  5. Implementation of the World Expo: As the event approaches, the host country makes a serious effort to prepare the World Expo. It sends out invitations to governments and organizations, prepares all cultural and city development programs and starts implementing site construction.
  6. Hosting the World Expo: Years of preparation culminate into the World Expo event: a six-month international event that brings together experts, artists, researchers, tourists and more to reflect on a chosen theme. Read more about the general history of the World Expo event here.
  7. Legacy of World Expo: A World Expo should not lose its relevance after the event. The BIE has to provide proper oversight in this stage too.

The World Expo Rotterdam 2025 Foundation is currently preparing a bid, which will be submitted to the BIE in 2016. In practice, that means we are conducting all research that is needed for hosting a World Expo. Like other competing nations, we do this in collaboration with the BIE, which shares its professional expertise in the subject matter.

For more information about the BIE, visit the official website.

Image Source: Juanedc (via Flickr Creative Commons).

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